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Volume 54(5); September 2020
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Reviews
Immune landscape and biomarkers for immuno-oncology in colorectal cancers
Jeong Mo Bae, Seung-Yeon Yoo, Jung Ho Kim, Gyeong Hoon Kang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):351-360.   Published online June 26, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.05.15
  • 4,489 View
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  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Recent advances in immuno-oncology have increased understanding of the tumor immune microenvironment (TIME), and clinical trials for immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment have shown remission and/or durable response in certain proportions of patients stratified by predictive biomarkers. The TIME in colorectal cancer (CRC) was initially evaluated several decades ago. The prognostic value of the immune response to tumors, including tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, peritumoral lymphoid reaction, and Crohn’s-like lymphoid reaction, has been well demonstrated. In this review, we describe the chronology of TIME research and review the up-to-date high-dimensional TIME landscape of CRC. We also summarize the clinical relevance of several biomarkers associated with immunotherapy in CRC, such as microsatellite instability, tumor mutational burden, POLE/POLD mutation, consensus molecular subtype, and programmed death-ligand 1 expression.

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  • Evaluation on Braking Stability of Autonomous Vehicles Running along Curved Sections Based on Asphalt Pavement Adhesion Properties
    Binshuang Zheng, Xiaoming Huang, Junyao Tang, Jiaying Chen, Runmin Zhao, Zhengqiang Hong, Tao Tang, Meiling Han, Yang Yang
    Journal of Advanced Transportation.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Intratumoral spatial heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is a significant factor for precisely stratifying prognostic immune subgroups of microsatellite instability-high colorectal carcinomas
    Minsun Jung, Ji Ae Lee, Seung-Yeon Yoo, Jeong Mo Bae, Gyeong Hoon Kang, Jung Ho Kim
    Modern Pathology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes With Survival in Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer
    Marina Vitorino, Inês Eiriz, Tiago C Tomás, Rodrigo Vicente, Ana Mendes, Ana Rita Freitas, Sofia Braga, Catarina Alves-Vale, Paula Borralho, André Ferreira, Luisa Leal da Costa
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tumor Mutational Burden Predicting the Efficacy of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yan Li, Yiqi Ma, Zijun Wu, Fanxin Zeng, Bin Song, Yanrong Zhang, Jinxing Li, Su Lui, Min Wu
    Frontiers in Immunology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Genomic and transcriptomic characterization of heterogeneous immune subgroups of microsatellite instability-high colorectal cancers
    Jung Ho Kim, Mi-Kyoung Seo, Ji Ae Lee, Seung-Yeon Yoo, Hyeon Jeong Oh, Hyundeok Kang, Nam-Yun Cho, Jeong Mo Bae, Gyeong Hoon Kang, Sangwoo Kim
    Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer.2021; 9(12): e003414.     CrossRef
Thyroid fine-needle aspiration cytology in Taiwan: a nationwide survey and literature update
Chien-Chin Chen, Jen-Fan Hang, Chih-Yi Liu, Yeh-Han Wang, Chiung-Ru Lai
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):361-366.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.07.17
  • 2,670 View
  • 120 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In Taiwan, thyroid fine-needle aspiration cytology is easily accessible and reliable for evaluating thyroid nodules. The sonographic pattern plays a major role and is the deciding factor for aspiration. We conducted a nationwide survey in 2017 and it revealed that 31% of laboratories had adopted The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology. There was a relatively high unsatisfactory rate (24.04%) and low rates of indeterminate diagnoses, including atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesions of undetermined significance: 4.87%, and follicular neoplasm/suspicious for a follicular neoplasm: 0.35%. Moreover, the risks of malignancy in benign, atypia of undetermined significance, and suspicious for a follicular neoplasm were relatively high. These may reflect strict diagnostic criteria for indeterminate categories and better patient selection for surgery. Improvements in specimen sampling and continuing education programs are crucial. Newly-developed thyroid cytology technologies, such as immunocytochemistry, molecular testing, and computerized cytomorphometry, may further facilitate cytology diagnoses.

Citations

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  • Comparison of fine-needle aspiration with fine-needle capillary cytology in thyroid nodules
    H Hatami, M Samsami, S Movahedinia, B Salehi, M Movahedinia, M Ardeshir
    The Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features: its updated diagnostic criteria, preoperative cytologic diagnoses and impact on the risk of malignancy
    Hee Young Na, So Yeon Park
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2022; 56(6): 319.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid malignancy rates according to the Bethesda reporting system in Israel - A multicenter study
    Ory Madgar, Galit Avior, Isaac Shochat, Ben-Zion Joshua, Lior Baraf, Yuval Avidor, Avi khafif, Niddal Assadi, Eran E. Alon
    European Journal of Surgical Oncology.2021; 47(6): 1370.     CrossRef
Pathologic interpretation of endoscopic ultrasound–guided fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy for pancreatic lesions
Haeryoung Kim, Kee-Taek Jang
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):367-377.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.07.21
  • 3,612 View
  • 148 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pathologic interpretation of endoscopic ultrasound–guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology/biopsy specimens is one of the most challenging tasks in cytology and surgical pathology practice, as the procedure often yields minimal amounts of diagnostic material and contains contaminants, such as blood cells and normal intestinal mucosa. EUS-FNA cytology/biopsy will nevertheless become a more popular procedure for evaluation of various pancreatic lesions because they are difficult to approach with conventional endoscopic procedures. Pathologists should understand the structural differences and limitations of EUS-FNA that make pathologic diagnosis difficult. Ancillary tests are available for differential diagnosis of EUS-FNA for various pancreatic lesions. Immunostains are the most commonly used ancillary tests, and pathologists should able to choose the necessary panel for differential diagnosis. Pathologists should review clinical history and radiologic and/or EUS findings before selecting an immunostain panel and making a pathologic diagnosis. In addition, one’s threshold of malignancy should be adjusted according to the appropriate clinical setting to avoid under-evaluation of pathologic diagnoses. Clinico-pathologic correlation is essential in pathologic evaluation of EUS-FNA for pancreatic lesions. Pathologists can reduce errors by correlating clinical and radiologic findings when evaluating EUS-FNA. Some molecular tests can be applied in differential diagnosis of pancreatic neoplastic and cystic lesions. Molecular data should be used as supportive evidence of a specific disease entity, rather than direct evidence, and should be correlated with clinico-pathologic findings to avoid errors in pathologic diagnosis.

Citations

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  • Double Ki-67 and synaptophysin labeling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor biopsies
    Bokyung Ahn, Jin Kying Jung, HaeSung Jung, Yeon-Mi Ryu, Yeon Wook Kim, Tae Jun Song, Do Hyun Park, Dae wook Hwang, HyungJun Cho, Sang-Yeob Kim, Seung-Mo Hong
    Pancreatology.2022; 22(3): 427.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration with 19-Gauge and 22-Gauge Needles for Solid Pancreatic Lesions
    Changjuan Li, Jianwei Mi, Fulai Gao, Xinying Zhu, Miao Su, Xiaoli Xie, Dongqiang Zhao
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 10439.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Prediction of TP53 mutations by p53 immunohistochemistry and their prognostic significance in gastric cancer
Hye Jung Hwang, Soo Kyung Nam, Hyunjin Park, Yujun Park, Jiwon Koh, Hee Young Na, Yoonjin Kwak, Woo Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):378-386.   Published online July 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.01
  • 4,381 View
  • 198 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Recently, molecular classifications of gastric cancer (GC) have been proposed that include TP53 mutations and their functional activity. We aimed to demonstrate the correlation between p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and TP53 mutations as well as their clinicopathological significance in GC.
Methods
Deep targeted sequencing was performed using surgical or biopsy specimens from 120 patients with GC. IHC for p53 was performed and interpreted as strong, weak, or negative expression. In 18 cases (15.0%) with discrepant TP53 mutation and p53 IHC results, p53 IHC was repeated.
Results
Strong expression of p53 was associated with TP53 missense mutations, negative expression with other types of mutations, and weak expression with wild-type TP53 (p<.001). The sensitivity for each category was 90.9%, 79.0%, and 80.9%, and the specificity was 95.4%, 88.1%, and 92.3%, respectively. The TNM stage at initial diagnosis exhibited a significant correlation with both TP53 mutation type (p=.004) and p53 expression status (p=.029). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for 109 stage II and III GC cases showed that patients with TP53 missense mutations had worse overall survival than those in the wild-type and other mutation groups (p=.028). Strong expression of p53 was also associated with worse overall survival in comparison to negative and weak expression (p=.035).
Conclusions
Results of IHC of the p53 protein may be used as a simple surrogate marker of TP53 mutations. However, negative expression of p53 and other types of mutations of TP53 should be carefully interpreted because of its lower sensitivity and different prognostic implications.

Citations

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  • Adrenal Nodules Detected at Staging CT in Patients with Resectable Gastric Cancers Have a Low Incidence of Malignancy
    Hae Young Kim, Won Chang, Yoon Jin Lee, Ji Hoon Park, Jungheum Cho, Hee Young Na, Hyungwoo Ahn, Sung Il Hwang, Hak Jong Lee, Young Hoon Kim, Kyoung Ho Lee
    Radiology.2022; 302(1): 129.     CrossRef
  • Intestinal-type gastric dysplasia in Helicobacter pylori-naïve patients
    Kotaro Shibagaki, Ayako Itawaki, Yoichi Miyaoka, Kenichi Kishimoto, Yusuke Takahashi, Satoshi Kotani, Tsuyoshi Mishiro, Naoki Oshima, Kousaku Kawashima, Norihisa Ishimura, Hideyuki Onuma, Makoto Nagasaki, Mamiko Nagase, Asuka Araki, Kyuichi Kadota, Ryoji
    Virchows Archiv.2022; 480(4): 783.     CrossRef
  • Dedifferentiation-like tubular and solid carcinoma of the stomach shows phenotypic divergence and association with deficient SWI/SNF complex
    Shih-Chiang Huang, Kuang-Hua Chen, Kwai-Fong Ng, I-Chieh Lin, Yi-Chun Chao, Ta-Sen Yeh, Huei-Chieh Chuang, Tse-Ching Chen
    Virchows Archiv.2022; 480(4): 771.     CrossRef
  • Distinct molecular phenotype and the potential prognostic value of immune prognostic index and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in hepatoid adenocarcinoma of stomach
    Muxing Kang, Xiaojing Ma, Jifei Shi, Guofeng Chen, Xiaoli Jin, Jun Wang, Lele Lin, Zhiwei Wu, Kaibo Chen, Jinghong Xu, Pintong Huang, Jian Chen
    Translational Oncology.2022; 19: 101380.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Tumor DNA Sequencing Results in Patients with Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Stratified by TP53 Mutation Status
    Anthony C Wood, Yonghong Zhang, Qianxing Mo, Ling Cen, Jacques Fontaine, Sarah E Hoffe, Jessica Frakes, Sean P Dineen, Jose M Pimiento, Christine M Walko, Rutika Mehta
    The Oncologist.2022; 27(4): 307.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive Clinical Analysis of Gallbladder Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: A Large-Volume Multicenter Study During One Decade
    Yangyang Wang, Bingfeng Huang, Qihan Fu, Jianing Wang, Mao Ye, Manyi Hu, Kai Qu, Kai Liu, Xiao Hu, Shumei Wei, Ke Sun, Wenbo Xiao, Bo Zhang, Haijun Li, Jingsong Li, Qi Zhang, Tingbo Liang
    Annals of Surgical Oncology.2022; 29(12): 7619.     CrossRef
  • Expression of SASP, DNA Damage Response, and Cell Proliferation Factors in Early Gastric Neoplastic Lesions: Correlations and Clinical Significance
    Li Liang, Yijie Chai, Fei Chai, Haijing Liu, Ningning Ma, Hong Zhang, Shuang Zhang, Lin Nong, Ting Li, Bo Zhang
    Pathology and Oncology Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systems biology and OMIC data integration to understand gastrointestinal cancers
    Iasmin Moreira Costa Bispo, Henry Paul Granger, Palloma Porto Almeida, Patricia Belini Nishiyama, Leandro Martins de Freitas
    World Journal of Clinical Oncology.2022; 13(10): 762.     CrossRef
  • Application of NGS molecular classification in the diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma: A supplement to traditional pathological diagnosis
    Qunxian Rao, Jianwei Liao, Yangyang Li, Xin Zhang, Guocai Xu, Changbin Zhu, Shengya Tian, Qiuhong Chen, Hui Zhou, Bingzhong Zhang
    Cancer Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • MicroRNA-552 expression in colorectal cancer and its clinicopathological significance
    Joon Im, Soo Kyung Nam, Hye Seung Lee
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2021; 55(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • Different effects of p53 protein overexpression on the survival of gastric cancer patients according to Lauren histologic classification: a retrospective study
    Ki Wook Kim, Nayoung Kim, Yonghoon Choi, Won Seok Kim, Hyuk Yoon, Cheol Min Shin, Young Soo Park, Dong Ho Lee, Young Suk Park, Sang-Hoon Ahn, Do Joong Park, Hyung-Ho Kim, Hye Seung Lee, Ji-Won Kim, Jin Won Kim, Keun-Wook Lee, Won Chang, Ji Hoon Park, Yoon
    Gastric Cancer.2021; 24(4): 844.     CrossRef
  • The association between the expression of nuclear Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) and p53 protein expression profile in breast cancer patients
    Yoon Jin Cha, Dooreh Kim, Soong June Bae, Sung Gwe Ahn, Joon Jeong, Min Kyung Cho, Pill Sun Paik, Tae-Kyung Yoo, Woo-Chan Park, Chang Ik Yoon, Elda Tagliabue
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(5): e0250986.     CrossRef
Lymph node size and its association with nodal metastasis in ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas
Jaehoon Shin, Seungbeom Shin, Jae Hoon Lee, Ki Byung Song, Dae Wook Hwang, Hyoung Jung Kim, Jae Ho Byun, HyungJun Cho, Song Cheol Kim, Seung-Mo Hong
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):387-395.   Published online July 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.23
  • 5,325 View
  • 103 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Although lymph node metastasis is a poor prognostic factor in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), our understanding of lymph node size in association with PDAC is limited. Increased nodal size in preoperative imaging has been used to detect node metastasis. We evaluated whether lymph node size can be used as a surrogate preoperative marker of lymph node metastasis.
Methods
We assessed nodal size and compared it to the nodal metastatic status of 200 patients with surgically resected PDAC. The size of all lymph nodes and metastatic nodal foci were measured along the long and short axis, and the relationships between nodal size and metastatic status were compared at six cutoff points.
Results
A total of 4,525 lymph nodes were examined, 9.1% of which were metastatic. The mean size of the metastatic nodes (long axis, 6.9±5.0 mm; short axis, 4.3±3.1 mm) was significantly larger than that of the non-metastatic nodes (long axis, 5.0±4.0 mm; short axis, 3.0±2.0 mm; all p<.001). Using a 10 mm cutoff, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, overall accuracy, and area under curve was 24.8%, 88.0%, 17.1%, 82.3%, and 0.60 for the long axis and 7.0%, 99.0%, 40.3%, 90.6%, and 0.61 for the short axis, respectively.
Conclusions
The metastatic nodes are larger than the non-metastatic nodes in PDAC patients. However, the difference in nodal size was too small to be identified with preoperative imaging. The performance of preoperative radiologic imaging to predict lymph nodal metastasis was not good. Therefore, nodal size cannot be used a surrogate preoperative marker of lymph node metastasis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Regional lymph node metastasis detected on preoperative CT and/or FDG-PET may predict early recurrence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma after curative resection
    Ja Kyung Yoon, Mi-Suk Park, Seung-Seob Kim, Kyunghwa Han, Hee Seung Lee, Seungmin Bang, Ho Kyoung Hwang, Sang Hyun Hwang, Mijin Yun, Myeong-Jin Kim
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of CA 19.9 in the Management of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: State of the Art and Future Perspectives
    Alessandro Coppola, Vincenzo La Vaccara, Tommaso Farolfi, Michele Fiore, Roberto Cammarata, Sara Ramella, Roberto Coppola, Damiano Caputo
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(9): 2091.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the 8th Edition AJCC Staging System for the Clinical Staging of Pancreatic Cancer
    Huapyong Kang, Seung-seob Kim, Min Je Sung, Jung Hyun Jo, Hee Seung Lee, Moon Jae Chung, Jeong Youp Park, Seung Woo Park, Si Young Song, Mi-Suk Park, Seungmin Bang
    Cancers.2022; 14(19): 4672.     CrossRef
  • Does direct invasion of peripancreatic lymph nodes impact survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma? A retrospective dual-center study
    Daisuke Hashimoto, Sohei Satoi, Mitsuaki Ishida, Kenji Nakagawa, Masaya Kotsuka, Tadataka Takagi, Hironori Ryota, Taichi Terai, Tatsuma Sakaguchi, Minako Nagai, So Yamaki, Takahiro Akahori, Tomohisa Yamamoto, Mitsugu Sekimoto, Masayuki Sho
    Pancreatology.2021; 21(5): 884.     CrossRef
  • CA19.9 Serum Level Predicts Lymph-Nodes Status in Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: A Retrospective Single-Center Analysis
    Alessandro Coppola, Vincenzo La Vaccara, Michele Fiore, Tommaso Farolfi, Sara Ramella, Silvia Angeletti, Roberto Coppola, Damiano Caputo
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Indirect pathological indicators for cardiac sarcoidosis on endomyocardial biopsy
Myung-Jin Cha, Jeong-Wook Seo, Seil Oh, Eun-Ah Park, Sang-Han Lee, Moon Young Kim, Jae-Young Park
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):396-410.   Published online July 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.10
  • 3,314 View
  • 88 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The definitive pathologic diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis requires observation of a granuloma in the myocardial tissue. It is common, however, to receive a “negative” report for a clinically probable case. We would like to advise pathologists and clinicians on how to interpret “negative” biopsies.
Methods
Our study samples were 27 endomyocardial biopsies from 25 patients, three cardiac transplantation and an autopsied heart with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. Pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features were compared.
Results
The presence of micro-granulomas or increased histiocytic infiltration was always (6/6 or 100%) associated with fatty infiltration and confluent fibrosis, and they showed radiological features of sarcoidosis. Three of five cases (60%) with fatty change and confluent fibrosis were probable for cardiac sarcoidosis on radiology. When either confluent fibrosis or fatty change was present, one-third (3/9) were radiologically probable for cardiac sarcoidosis. We interpreted cases with micro-granuloma as positive for cardiac sarcoidosis (five of 25, 20%). Cases with both confluent fibrosis and fatty change were interpreted as probable for cardiac sarcoidosis (seven of 25, 28%). Another 13 cases, including eight cases with either confluent fibrosis or fatty change, were interpreted as low probability based on endomyocardial biopsy.
Conclusions
The presence of micro-granuloma could be an evidence for positive diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis. Presence of both confluent fibrosis and fatty change is necessary for probable cardiac sarcoidosis in the absence of granuloma. Either of confluent fibrosis or fatty change may be an indirect pathological evidence but they are interpreted as nonspecific findings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Histology of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Novel Considerations Arranged upon a Pathologic Basis
    Shu Kato, Yasuhiro Sakai, Asako Okabe, Yoshiaki Kawashima, Kazuhiko Kuwahara, Kazuya Shiogama, Masato Abe, Hiroyasu Ito, Shin’ichiro Morimoto
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(1): 251.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac sarcoidosis: A multimodal approach to reach the diagnosis
    Nicolas Piriou, Patrick Bruneval
    International Journal of Cardiology.2021; 323: 264.     CrossRef
  • Value of 3D mapping‐guided endomyocardial biopsy in cardiac sarcoidosis
    Danielle M. Haanschoten, Ahmet Adiyaman, Nils A. ‘t Hart, Piet L. Jager, Arif Elvan
    European Journal of Clinical Investigation.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Sarcoidosis: A Clinical Overview
    Ana Carolina Alba, Shyla Gupta, Lakshmi Kugathasan, Andrew Ha, Alejandro Ochoa, Meyer Balter, Alvaro Sosa Liprandi, Maria Inés Sosa Liprandi
    Current Problems in Cardiology.2021; 46(10): 100936.     CrossRef
Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus and its genotype distribution in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas
Yuil Kim, Young-Hoon Joo, Min-Sik Kim, Youn Soo Lee
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):411-418.   Published online July 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.22
  • 5,155 View
  • 129 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
High-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in a subset of head and neck (HN) squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). For oropharyngeal SCCs, HR HPV positivity is known to be associated with good prognosis, and a separate staging system for HPV-associated carcinomas using p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a surrogate test has been adopted in the 8th American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. We examined the HR HPV status and the genotype distribution in five HN subsites.
Methods
Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections were used for p16 IHC and DNA extraction. HPV DNA detection and genotyping were done employing either a DNA chip-based or real-time polymerase chain reaction–based method.
Results
During 2011–2019, a total of 466 SCCs were tested for HPV DNA with 34.1% positivity for HR HPV. Among HN subsites, the oropharynx showed the highest HR HPV prevalence (149/205, 75.1%), followed by the sinonasal tract (3/14, 21.4%), larynx (5/43, 11.6%), hypopharynx (1/38, 2.6%), and oral cavity (1/166, 0.6%). The most common HPV genotype was HPV16 (84.3%) followed by HPV35 (6.9%) and HPV33 (4.4%). Compared with HR HPV status, the sensitivity and specificity of p16 IHC were 98.6% and 94.3% for the oropharynx, and 99.2% and 93.8% for the tonsil, respectively.
Conclusions
Using a Korean dataset, we confirmed that HR HPV is most frequently detected in oropharyngeal SCCs. p16 positivity showed a good concordance with HR HPV DNA for oropharyngeal and especially tonsillar carcinomas. The use of p16 IHC may further be extended to predict HR HPV positivity in sinonasal tract SCCs.

Citations

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  • Positive Rate of Human Papillomavirus and Its Trend in Head and Neck Cancer in South Korea
    Hyun Woong Jun, Yong Bae Ji, Chang Myeon Song, Jae Kyung Myung, Hae Jin Park, Kyung Tae
    Frontiers in Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transcriptionally active HPV in OPMD and OSCC: A systematic review following the CAP/ASCO guidelines
    Laura Borges Kirschnick, Lauren Frenzel Schuch, Maria Eduarda Pérez‐de‐Oliveira, Ana Gabriela Costa Normando, Bruno Augusto Linhares Almeida Mariz, Eliete Neves Silva Guerra, Felipe Martins Silveira, Ana Carolina Uchoa Vasconcelos, Luciana Estevam Simonat
    Oral Diseases.2022; 28(8): 2309.     CrossRef
  • High-risk HPV Does not Appear to be an Important Risk Factor for Sinonasal Carcinomas in Turkish Population: A Tertiary Center Experience
    Evsen Apaydin Arikan, Levent Aydemir, Murat Ulusan, Dilek Yilmazbayhan, Yasemin Ozluk
    International Journal of Surgical Pathology.2022; : 106689692210915.     CrossRef
  • Effect of National Oral Health Screening Program on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: A Korean National Population-Based
    Chan Woo Wee, Hyo-Jung Lee, Jae-Ryun Lee, Hyejin Lee, Min-Jeong Kwoen, Woo-Jin Jeong, Keun-Yong Eom
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2022; 54(3): 709.     CrossRef
  • Expression of p16, p53, and TLR9 in HPV-Associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Clinicopathological Correlations and Potential Prognostic Significance
    Shu Wang, Xibing Zhuang, Caixia Gao, Tiankui Qiao
    OncoTargets and Therapy.2021; Volume 14: 867.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Human Papilloma Virus in Dictating Outcomes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
    Shane Brennan, Anne-Marie Baird, Esther O’Regan, Orla Sheils
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Contemporary Systematic Review on Repartition of HPV-Positivity in Oropharyngeal Cancer Worldwide
    Amanda F. Carlander, Kathrine K. Jakobsen, Simone K. Bendtsen, Martin Garset-Zamani, Charlotte D. Lynggaard, Jakob Schmidt Jensen, Christian Grønhøj, Christian von Buchwald
    Viruses.2021; 13(7): 1326.     CrossRef
  • The Prevalence of High- and Low-Risk Types of HPV in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck, Patients with Chronic Tonsillitis, and Healthy Individuals Living in Poland
    Joanna Katarzyna Strzelczyk, Krzysztof Biernacki, Jadwiga Gaździcka, Elżbieta Chełmecka, Katarzyna Miśkiewicz-Orczyk, Natalia Zięba, Janusz Strzelczyk, Maciej Misiołek
    Diagnostics.2021; 11(12): 2180.     CrossRef
A retrospective cytohistological correlation of fine-needle aspiration cytology with classification by the Milan System for Reporting Salivary Gland Cytopathology
Ji Hyun Park, Yoon Jin Cha, Ja Yeong Seo, Jae Yol Lim, Soon Won Hong
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):419-425.   Published online July 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.09
  • 2,946 View
  • 122 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Before publication of the new classification system named the Milan System for Reporting Salivary Gland Cytopathology (MSRSGC) in 2018, there was no standard classification for salivary gland lesions obtained by fine-needle aspiration (FNA). We therefore aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of this system by retrospectively reviewing FNA samples using the MSRSGC and to determine their risk of developing into neoplasms and becoming malignant.
Methods
Retrospective slide review and classification of salivary gland FNAs obtained over a 6-year period (2013–2018) at a single center were performed by two pathologists. The risks of neoplasm and malignancy for each category also were calculated.
Results
This study surveyed 374 FNAs (371 patients) performed over a six-year period and selected 148 cases that included documented surgical follow-up (39.6%). Among the surgically treated cases, the distributions of FNA categories were as follows: non-diagnostic (ND; 16.9%), non-neoplastic (NN; 2.7%), atypia of undetermined significance (AUS; 3.4%), benign (BN; 54.7%), salivary gland neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential (SUMP; 10.1%), suspicious for malignancy (SM; 6.8%), and malignant (M; 5.4%). The risk of malignancy (ROM) was 24.0% for ND, 0% for NN, 40.0% for AUS, 2.5% for BN, 46.7% for SUMP, 100% for SM, and 87.5% for M. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95.9% (142/148 cases).
Conclusions
The newly proposed MSRSGC appears to be a reliable system for classification of salivary gland lesions according to the associated ROM.

Citations

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  • Milan system for reporting salivary gland cytopathology: Adoption and outcomes in a community setting
    Samih J. Nassif, Ali R. Sasani, Garrey T. Faller, Jennifer L. Harb, Jagdish K. Dhingra
    Head & Neck.2022; 44(6): 1462.     CrossRef
  • Nondiagnostic salivary gland FNAs are associated with decreased risk of malignancy compared with “all‐comer” patients: Analysis of the Milan System for Reporting Salivary Gland Cytopathology with a focus on Milan I: No
    Shu K. Lui, Troy Tenney, Patrick C. Mullane, Kartik Viswanathan, Daniel J. Lubin
    Cancer Cytopathology.2022; 130(10): 800.     CrossRef
  • Application of the Milan System for Reporting Salivary Gland Cytopathology: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Zhaoyang Wang, Huan Zhao, Huiqin Guo, Changming An
    Cancer Cytopathology.2022; 130(11): 849.     CrossRef
  • Multiplexed single‐cell analysis of FNA allows accurate diagnosis of salivary gland tumors
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Case Study
Renal intravascular large B cell lymphoma: the first case report in Korea and a review of the literature
Moonsik Kim, Haerim Chung, Woo Ick Yang, Hyeon Joo Jeong
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):426-431.   Published online August 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.06.18
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Herein, we describe the first case of renal intravascular large B cell lymphoma in Korea occurring in a 66-year-old female. She presented with mild fever and dyspnea. On physical and laboratory evaluations, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis was suspected, but the bone marrow biopsy results were unremarkable. During the work-up, massive proteinuria developed, which led to a renal biopsy. The renal architecture was relatively well-preserved, but the glomeruli were hypercellular with the infiltration of atypical, large lymphoid cells with increased nucleus-cytoplasm ratio and clumped chromatin. Similar cells were also present in the peritubular capillaries. The tumor cells exhibited membranous staining for CD20 and CD79a. After the diagnosis of intravascular large B cell lymphoma, the patient received rituximab-based chemotherapy under close follow-up.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intravascular large B‐cell lymphoma in renal cell carcinoma incidentally detected by robot‐assisted partial nephrectomy
    Michio Noda, Yutaka Enomoto, Yukari Shirasugi, Sumiyo Ando, Yukimasa Matsuzawa, Haruki Kume
    IJU Case Reports.2022; 5(3): 191.     CrossRef
  • Case Report: Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Clinicopathologic Study of Four Cases With Review of Additional 331 Cases in the Literature
    Yingying Han, Qingjiao Li, Dan Wang, Lushan Peng, Tao Huang, Chunlin Ou, Keda Yang, Junpu Wang
    Frontiers in Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Renal Involvement of CD20-Negative Intravascular Large B Cell Lymphoma with Neurological Manifestations
    Faten Aqeel, Serena M. Bagnasco, Duvuru Geetha, Yoshihide Fujigaki
    Case Reports in Nephrology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
Brief Case Report
Breast implant–associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: the first South Korean case
Jongwon Lee, Hyungwoo Cho, Dok Hyun Yoon, Eun Key Kim, Gyungyub Gong, Cheolwon Suh, Joo-ryung Huh
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):432-434.   Published online August 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.07.01
  • 2,670 View
  • 105 Download
  • 2 Citations
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report with a history of spontaneously resolved late seroma
    Do Yeon Kim, Joon Hur, Woo Yeon Han, Kyunghyun Min, Jong Won Lee, Jin Sup Eom, Hyun Ho Han, Eun Key Kim
    Archives of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.2021; 27(4): 143.     CrossRef
  • Comment on “Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: the first South Korean case”
    Il-Kug Kim, Tae Gon Kim
    Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine.2021; 55(6): 419.     CrossRef
Corrigendum
Correction of author’s name: Atypical femoral neck fracture after prolonged bisphosphonate therapy
Kwang-kyoun Kim, Yong Wook Park, Tae-hyeong Kim, Kyung-deok Seo
J Pathol Transl Med. 2020;54(5):435-435.   Published online September 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2020.09.07
Corrects: J Pathol Transl Med 2020;54(4):346
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JPTM : Journal of Pathology and Translational Medicine