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JPTM > Ahead-of Print

doi: https://doi.org/10.4132/jptm.2019.02.20    [Epub ahead of print]
Association between Expression of 8-OHdG and Cigarette Smoking in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
Ae Ri An1, Kyoung Min Kim1, Ho Sung Park, Kyu Yun Jang1, Woo Sung Moon1, Myoung Jae Kang1, Yong Chul Lee2, Jong Hun Kim3, Han Jung Chae4, Myoung Ja Chung1
1Department of Pathology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, and Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Jeonju, Korea
2Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, and Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Jeonju, Korea
3Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, and Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Jeonju, Korea
4Department of Pharmacology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, and Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Jeonju, Korea
Corresponding Author: Myoung Ja Chung ,Tel: 82-63-270-3072, Fax: 82-63-270-3135, Email: mjchung@jbnu.ac.kr
Received: December 11, 2018;  Revised: February 1, 2019  Accepted: February 20, 2019.  Published online: March 11, 2019.
ABSTRACT

Background:
Exposure to cigarette smoking (CS) is a major risk factor for the development of lung cancer. CS is known to cause oxidative DNA damage and mutation of tumor-related genes, and these factors are involved in carcinogenesis. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is considered to be a reliable biomarker for oxidative DNA damage. Increased levels of 8-OHdG are associated with a number of pathological conditions, including cancer. There are no reports on the expression of 8-OHdG by immunohistochemistry in NSCLC.
Methods:
We investigated the expression of 8-OHdG and p53 in 203 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues using immunohistochemistry and correlated it with clinicopathological features including smoking.
Results:
The expression of 8-OHdG was observed in 83.3% of NSCLC. It was significantly correlated with a low T stage, negative lymph node status, never-smoker, and longer overall survival (P < 0.05) by univariate analysis. But multivariate analysis revealed that 8-OHdG was not an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in NSCLC patients. The aberrant expression of p53 significantly correlated with smoking, male, squamous cell carcinoma, and Ki-67 positivity (P < 0.05).
Conclusions:
The expression of 8-OHdG was associated with good prognostic factors. It was positively correlated with never-smokers in NSCLC, suggesting that oxidative damage of DNA cannot be explained by smoking alone and may depend on complex control mechanisms.
Key Words: non-small cell lung cancer, 8-OHdG, p53, smoking, immunohistochemistry